Early Learning & Pre-Kindergarten

List of 4 items.

  • Entering Early Learning Program I

    Favorite Books to Read: 
    • The Little Mouse, the Red Ripe Strawberry, and the Big Hungry Bear (by Don Wood)
    • Here Are My Hands (by Bill Martin, Jr.)
    • The Crown on Your Head (by Nancy Tillman)
    • The Napping House (by by Audrey Wood)
    • I Love You More than Rainbows (by Susan Crites)
    • Love You Forever (by Robert Munsch)
    • Beginner’s Bible Stories
    • Other books by Dr. Seuss, Eric Carle, Sandra Boynton, Karen Katz, or Byron Barton
    • Books that are also songs, like the Itsy Bitsy Spider, the Wheels on the Bus, You Are My Sunshine, and Snuggle Puppy  (A few favorite authors of this genre include Iza Trapani, Raffi, Eileen Christelow, and Sandra Boynton)
    • Have fun reading with your child! Books featuring animals or machines invite movement and making sounds. Books with flaps or different textures to touch keep hands busy. Books with detailed illustrations or recurring items hidden in the pictures are great for exploring and discussing.

    Websites with More Ideas:
    http://www.startwithabook.org/
    http://www.justbooksreadaloud.com/
    http://www.notimeforflashcards.com/
    www.day2dayparenting.com/

    Gross Motor Skills:
    • Play gentle tickle games with your baby, but make sure to stop when she lets you know she has had enough. Watch her carefully and you will know.
    • Children can find endless uses for boxes. A box big enough for your child to fit in can become a fun play space, while an appliance box can be cut to include a doorway your child must step over before entering.
    • Babies enjoy push and pull toys. Make your own pull toy by threading yogurt cartons, spools, or small boxes on a piece of yarn or soft string (about 2 feet long). Tie a bead or plastic stacking ring on one end for a handle.
    • Dance to music with your baby. Hold his hands while he bends up and down. Clap and praise him when he “dances” by himself. Use songs with different beats, helping him dance slow or fast along with the music.
    • Sit on the floor with your baby and roll a ball back and forth. Clap your hands when your baby pushes the ball or “catches” it with his hands.

    Fine Motor Skills:
    • Tape a large piece of drawing paper to a table. Show your baby how to scribble with large nontoxic crayons. Take turns making marks on the paper. It’s also fun to paint with water.
    • Cut up safe finger foods (do not use foods that pose a danger of your baby’s choking) in small pieces and allow your baby to feed himself. It is good practice to pick up small things and feel different textures (bananas, soft crackers, berries).
    • Finger paint with pudding, shaving cream, etc.
    • Play with puzzles. (Trade with neighbors to keep them fresh throughout the summer!)
    • Manipulate blocks, boxes, and other stackable toys or items that come apart and fit back together.
    • Provide toys that have parts that go into holes, such as shape sorters or simple puzzles, for your baby to explore.
    • Create a sensory box with a large storage container. Add a variety of items throughout the summer, such as sand or water along with cups, recycled containers, and other items to pour with in a messy area.
    •  
    • Cognitive Skills:
    • Let your baby “help” during daily routines. Encourage your baby to “get” the cup and spoon for mealtime, to “find” shoes and coat for dressing, and to “bring” the pants or diaper for changing. Following directions is an important skill for your baby to learn.
    • This is the time your baby learns that adults can be useful! When your baby “asks” for something by vocalizing or pointing, respond to his signal. Name the object your baby wants and encourage him to communicate again—taking turns with each other in a “conversation.”
    • When you are dressing or diapering your baby, talk about her body parts and show her your body parts. Say, “Here is Daddy’s nose. Here is Destiny’s nose.”
    • Babies love games at this age (Pat-a-Cake, This Little Piggy). Try different ways of playing the games and see if your baby will try it with you. Hide behind furniture or doors for Peekaboo; clap blocks or pan lids for Pat-a-cake.
    • Teach your child simple songs and fingerplays, such as “The Itsy-Bitsy Spider,” “The Wheels on the Bus,” or “This Little Light of Mine.”
    • Try to have set routines during the day and let your child know what will be happening next. Say, “Remember, after we change your diaper, we will go outside and play.”
    • Let your baby know every day how much you love him and how special he is!
    • Read, read, read! Read favorite stories again and again. Seek out books about things your child especially likes — trains, animals, even the moon. These books may extend their attention span and build enthusiasm for reading.
    • Ask lots of questions! Toddlers have opinions, thoughts, and interesting ideas about their world. Encourage your child to tell you what he or she thinks. You'll build language skills and learn what makes your child “tick” at the same time. You can also stage other learning experiences: Set up a zoo with all the stuffed animals. Stage a race with the toy cars. Put your toddler in charge and simply ask lots of questions.
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  • Entering Early Learning Program II

    Favorite Books to Read: 
    • Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? (and the other versions by Bill Martin, Jr.)
    • We’re Going on a Bear Hunt (by Helen Oxenbury)
    • Beginner’s Bible Stories
    • Kevin Henkes’ books
    • Little Blue Truck series (by Alice Schertle)
    • Dog’s Colorful Day (by Emma Dodd)
    • Duck and Goose series (by Tad Hills)
    • Skip to the Lou, My Darling (by Sally Lloyd Jones)
    • If You Give a … series (by Laura Numeroff)
    • Today is Monday (by Eric Carle)
    • The Very Hungry Caterpillar (by Eric Carle)
    • Books that are also songs, like the Itsy Bitsy Spider, the Wheels on the Bus, Five Little Monkeys, Five Green and Speckled Frogs, Snuggle Puppy, Baby Beluga, and Shake Your Silies Out  (A few favorite authors of this genre include Iza Trapani, Raffi, Eileen Christelow, and Sandra Boynton)

    Websites with More Ideas:
    http://www.startwithabook.org/
    http://www.justbooksreadaloud.com/
    http://www.notimeforflashcards.com/

    Gross Motor:
    • Kick and throw balls (both under- and over-hand)
    • Ride scooters and tricycles
    • Practice balancing and hopping on one leg
    • Walk up stairs using alternate feet (not pausing on each step with both feet)
    • Play Follow the Leader and let your child copy your actions, as well as be the leader! Walk on tiptoes, walk backward, walk slow or fast and with big steps or little steps.
    • Action is an important part of a child’s life. Play a game with a ball where you give directions and your child does the actions, such as “Roll the ball.” Kick, throw, push, bounce, and catch are other good actions. Take turns giving the directions.
    • Make an adventure path outside. Use a garden hose, rope, or piece of chalk and make a “path” that goes under the bench, around the tree, and along the wall. Walk your child through the path first, using these words. After she can do it, make a new path or have your child make a path.
    • Act like animals. Can your child stand like a flamingo, squat like a duck, run on all fours like a lion?And, of course, don’t forget to make the appropriate animal sounds!
    • While at the park, make a “river” by placing a folded towel on the ground. Tell your child the towel is a pretend river and ask if s/he can jump over it without getting his/her feet wet. As your child gets better, unfold the towel for more of a challenge.
    • Bubbles! Blow bubbles up high and watch your child jump and try to pop the bubbles by clapping his/her hands. Switch and blow the bubbles towards the ground so s/he can stomp on them. Encourage your child to practice blowing bubbles, too!

    Fine Motor:
    • String beads, cereal, pasta, etc.
    • Take time to draw with your child when she wants to get out paper and crayons. Draw large shapes and let your child color them in. Take turns.
    • Work on puzzles. (Trade with neighbors to keep them fresh throughout the summer!)
    • Make playdough together, letting your child measure and pour the ingredients. After cooking, roll “snakes,” form small balls to smash, or make other creations from their imagination.
    • Explore with sidewalk chalk. Play a drawing game where you follow your child’s lead by copying exactly what s/he draws. Next, encourage your child to copy your drawings, such as circles, straight and intersecting lines, or simple shapes.
    • Create a sensory box with a large storage container. Add a variety of items throughout the summer, such as sand, rice, noodles, or water along with funnels, spoons, cups, recycled containers, and items to pour with in a messy area.
    • Open lids. Enclose toys or snacks inside snap-top containers and let your child take the lid off to get the surprise.
    • Build towers.  Give your child cereal boxes, oatmeal boxes, etc. to stack.
    • Finger paint with pudding, shaving cream, etc.

    Cognitive skills:
    • Read, read, read! The topic of the book does not matter. Reading with your child develops critical skills. Stories with rhyming words, new vocabulary, and vibrant pictures are wonderful! When you look at magazines or children’s books together, ask your child to point to pictures as you name them, such as “Where is the truck?” Be silly and ask him to point with an elbow or foot. Ask him to show you something that is round or something that goes fast.
    • Point out colors, numbers, and letters in your everyday conversations! Notice the blue shirt your child chose to wear or that they have six carrots to finish eating.
    • Give your toddler choices, but keep them simple. Let her choose a red or a blue shirt while dressing. Let her choose milk or juice at lunch.
    • Try to have set routines during the day and let your child know what will be happening next. Say, “Remember, after you brush your teeth, you get dressed.”
    • Teach your child simple songs and fingerplays, such as “The Itsy-Bitsy Spider,” “The Wheels on the Bus,” or “This Little Light of Mine;” or add actions to other favorite nursery rhymes, such as “Here We Go ‘Round the Mulberry Bush,” “Jack Be Nimble,” “This Is the Way We Wash Our Clothes,” and “Ring Around the Rosy.”
    • Your toddler is learning all about emotions. Help him label his feelings when he is mad, sad, happy, or silly. Say You are really happy” or “You seem really upset.”
    • While cooking or eating dinner, play the “more or less” game with your child. Ask who has more potatoes and who has less. Try this using same-size glasses or cups, filled with juice or milk.
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  • Entering Pre-Kindergarten I

    Pre-Kindergarten I students will need the following items when school begins:
    • Regular-size backpack (large enough to hold a regular size folder)
    • Water bottle (to be sent home each afternoon)
    • Healthy snack (daily)
    • Large Ziploc-style bag containing a weather appropriate change of clothes, including socks and shoes.
    • All items coming to school to be clearly labeled with your child’s name, including coats, water bottle and snack containers, backpacks, lunchboxes and lovies (if staying beyond noon dismissal), etc.
    • The following forms must also be on file: State of Florida Health form, Immunization Record, and a copy of your child’s birth certificate or passport.
    All students entering Pre-Kindergarten I must be fully potty trained. We consider a child potty-trained when s/he is able to articulate the need to go to the bathroom (i.e., stop playing and go to the bathroom). This must be happening with consistency at home and the child must be wearing underwear for the duration of their day at St. Mark’s (not diapers or pull-ups, including during rest periods). If your child is not fully potty-trained, please contact the Director of Admission immediately and we will be glad to discuss your options.
     
    Favorite Books to Read:

    • Pete the Cat series (by Eric Litwin)
    • Press Here (by Herve Tullet)
    • Elephant and Piggies series (by Mo Willems)
    • Silly Tilly (by Eileen Spinelli)
    • I Will Chomp You (by Jory John)
    • Truckery Rhymes (by Jon Scieszka)
    • Kipper’s A to Z: An Alphabet Adventure (by Mick Inkpen)
    • Cookie’s Week (by Cindy Ward)
    • Have You Filled a Bucket Today? (by Carol McCloud)

    Apps to Try:
    • Letter School
    • My ABC Tracer
    • Endless School Bundle (there are several different individual apps available in the “Endless” series)
    • ABC Alphabet Phonics
    • Fun Brain Jr.
    • Kids’ Learning Puzzles (there are a variety of options!)
    • Little Digits
    • TinyHands Puzzles and Games
    • LEGO and LEGO Jr.

    Websites with More Ideas:
    http://www.justbooksreadaloud.com/
    http://www.startwithabook.org/
    http://growingbookbybook.com/
    http://www.notimeforflashcards.com/
    http://theimaginationtree.com/
    https://www.commonsensemedia.org/

    Gross Motor Skills:
    • Kick or throw balls overhand
    • Ride tricycles
    • Walk on a low balance beam
    • Hop on one foot
    • Play toss and catch games in a kneeling position
    • Wheelbarrow walk
    • Create an obstacle course using chairs to crawl under or over, small items to jump, etc.
    • Mimic animal movements (crab walking, bunny and kangaroo hops, racing like a cheetah, marching like an elephant)
    • Blow bubbles
    • “Paint” a fence or wall with different brushes or rollers and water
    Fine Motor Skills:
    • Make playdough together, letting your child measure and pour the ingredients. After cooking, roll “snakes,” form small balls to smash, or make other creations from their imagination.
    • Create a sensory box with a large storage container. Add a variety of items throughout the summer, such as sand, rice, noodles, birdseed, or water; funnels, spoons, cups, and items to pour with; or even safety scissors (with supervision) with different items to cut (straws, paper, construction paper, cardstock, envelopes, etc.)
    • String beads, pieces of straw, cereal, pasta, etc.
    • Work on independently completing small puzzles. (Trade with neighbors to keep them fresh throughout the summer!)
    • Explore with sidewalk chalk. Play a drawing game where you follow your child’s lead by copying exactly what s/he draws. Next, encourage your child to copy your drawings, such as circles, straight and intersecting lines, or simple shapes.
    Cognitive Skills:
    • Point out colors, numbers, and letters in your everyday conversations! Notice the blue shirt your child chose to wear or that they have six carrots to finish eating.
    • Draw simple pictures of faces that show happy, sad, excited, or silly expressions. Cut them out and glue them on a Popsicle stick or pencil. Let your child act out the different feelings with the puppets.
    • Tell your child a simple story about something she did that was funny or interesting. See if your child can tell a different story about herself.
    • Give your child directions that have at least two steps when you and he are cooking, dressing, or cleaning. Say, “Put that pan in the sink, and then pick up the red spoon.”
    • Play games that involve following simple rules, such as Mother May I and Red Light, Green Light.
    • When doing housework or yard work, allow your child to do a small part on his/her own. Let him/her empty the wastebasket or clean crumbs off the table. Begin to encourage your child to get dressed on their own each day, selecting what to where from a couple of options and then independently dressing themselves.
    • Read, read, read! The topic of the book does not matter. Reading with your child develops critical skills. Stories with rhyming words, new vocabulary, and vibrant pictures are wonderful, but also consider sharing a chapter book and favorite nursery rhymes from your own childhood.
     
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  • Entering Pre-Kindergarten II

    Favorite Books to Read: 
    • If I Built a House/Car (by Chris van Dusen)
    • Chrysanthemum (by Kevin Henkes)
    • The Book with No Pictures (by BJ Novak)
    • Sheep in a Jeep series (by Nancy Shaw)
    • Millie Waits for the Mail (by Alexander Steffensmeier)
    • Iggy Peck, Architect and Rosie Revere, Engineer (by Andrea Beaty)
    • The Name Jar (by Yangsook Choi)
    • The Hello, Goodbye Window (by Norton Juster)
    Apps to Try:
    • Letter School
    • Little Writer
    • Endless School Bundle (there are several different individual apps available in the “Endless” series)
    • Word Teller for Kids
    • TinyHands Puzzles and Games
    • Abricot Games - Hide and Seek
    • LEGO and LEGO Jr.
    • Crazy Gears
    • Faces iMake
    • KidQ (Scholastic Parent and Child)
    • Bedtime Math
    • Kindoma (read together over video chat)

    Websites with More Ideas:
    http://www.justbooksreadaloud.com/
    http://www.startwithabook.org/
    http://growingbookbybook.com/
    http://www.prekinders.com/
    http://www.getreadytoread.org/
    https://www.commonsensemedia.org/
    http://www.starfall.com/


    Pre-Kindergarten II students will need the following items when school begins:
    • Water bottle (to be sent home each afternoon)
    • Healthy snack (daily)
    • Large Ziploc-style bag containing a weather appropriate change of clothes, including socks and shoes.
    • All items coming to school to be clearly labeled with your child’s name, including coats, water bottle and snack containers, backpacks, lunchboxes and lovies (if staying beyond noon dismissal), etc.
    • The following forms must also be on file: State of Florida Health form, Immunization Record, and a copy of your child’s birth certificate or passport.  
    Gross Motor Skills:
    • Make an obstacle course either inside or outside your home. You can use cardboard boxes for jumping over or climbing through, broomsticks for laying between chairs for “limbo” (going under), and pillows for walking around. Let your child help lay out the course. After a couple of practice tries, have him complete the obstacle course. Then try hopping or jumping through the course.
    • Play “bucket hoops.” Have your child stand about 6 feet away and throw a medium-size ball overhand at a large bucket or trash can. For fun outdoors on a summer day, fill the bucket with water.
    • When your child has friends over, encourage them to play games that require working together. Try building a tent out of old blankets, playing catch, or acting out stories.
    • Stay active! Ride tricycles, walk on a balance beam, hop on one foot, wheelbarrow walk or crab walk, climb the monkey bars or small trees, swing, and swim!
    • Play toss and catch games in a kneeling position

    Fine Motor Skills:
    • Build a store, house, puppet stage, or fire truck out of old boxes. Your child can invite a friend over to play store or house, have a puppet show, or be firefighters.
    • Go on a walk and pick up things you find. Bring the items home and help your child sort them into groups. For example, groups can include rocks, paper or leaves. Encourage your child to start a collection of special things. Find a box or special place where he can display the collection.
    • Provide opportunities for your child to be creative. Empty containers, glue, newspapers, rubber bands, and magazines can be used to make new inventions. Make a collage or their own creative design. Cut out specific shapes, such as coupons.
    • Practice picking up any kind of beans, pom-poms, etc. with tweezers.
    • “Write” and mail a letter to a friend or relative. Provide your child with paper, crayons or pencil, and an envelope. Let your child draw, scribble, or write; or he can tell you what to write down. When your child is finished, let him fold the letter to fit in the envelope, lick, and seal. You can write the address on the front. Be sure to let him decorate the envelope as well. After he has put the stamp on, help mail the letter.
    • Make chains, bracelets, etc. out of paper clips or let them cut paper into strips to make larger chains, independently taping them together for practice at controlling the paper and tape!
    • Practice writing first names of friends, toys, and relatives. Your child may need to trace the letters of these names at first. Be sure to write in large print letters.
    • Let your child help you with simple cooking tasks such as mashing potatoes, making cheese sandwiches, and fixing a bowl of cereal. Afterward, see if he can tell you the order that you followed to cook and mash the potatoes or to get the bread out of the cupboard and put the cheese on it
    • Make playdough together, letting your child measure and pour the ingredients. After cooking, roll “snakes,” form small balls to smash, or make other creations from their imagination.
    • Create a sensory box with a large storage container. Add a variety of items throughout the summer, such as sand, rice, birdseed, or water; funnels, spoons, cups, and items to pour with; or safety scissors (with supervision) with different items to cut (straws, paper, construction paper, cardstock, envelopes, etc.)
    • Work on independently completing puzzles. (Trade with neighbors to keep them fresh throughout the summer!)
    • Explore with sidewalk chalk. Play a drawing game where you follow your child’s lead by copying exactly what s/he draws. Next, encourage your child to copy your drawings, such as basic shapes, people, or simple animals!

    Cognitive Skills:
    • Play games with your child such as Go Fish, Checkers, or Candy Land. Board games or card games that have three or more rules are great.
    • Invite your child to play a counting game. Using a large piece of paper, make a simple game board with a straight path. Use dice to determine the count. Count with your child, and encourage her to hop the game piece to each square, counting each time the piece touches down.
    • Look for numbers and letters everywhere! You can play “license plate count up” in the car or on the bus. Look for a license plate that contains the number 1. Then try to find other plates with 2, 3, 4, and so forth, up to 10. When your child can play “count-up,” play “count-down,” starting with the number 9, then 8, 7, 6, and so forth, down to 1.
    • Play the “memory” game. Put five or six familiar objects on a table. Have your child close her eyes. Remove one object, and rearrange the rest. Ask your child which object is missing. Take turns finding
    • Give your child directions that have at least three steps when you and he are cooking, dressing, or cleaning. Say, “Brush your teeth, comb your hair, and put on your sock and shoes.”
    • Play games that involve following simple rules, such as Mother May I and Red Light, Green Light, or board games!
    • When doing housework or yard work, allow your child to do a small part on his/her own. Let him/her empty the wastebasket or clean crumbs off the table. Begin to encourage your child to get dressed on their own each day, selecting what to where from a couple of options and then independently dressing themselves.
    • Fill a small tub with sand, rice or shaving cream, and trace letters or numbers in it.
    • Use letter or number stamps to stamp repeatedly on a piece of paper.  Smelly stamp pads are inviting.
    • Count everything! Count toys as they clean up. Collect shells at the beach and count them. How many pairs of shoes do they have (counting by twos!)? How many stop signs do you pass on the way to their friend’s house?
    • Read, read, read! Children love to have someone read to them. The topic of the book does not matter. Stories with rhyming words, new vocabulary, and vibrant pictures are wonderful, but also consider sharing a chapter book and favorite nursery rhymes from your own childhood. Use these opportunities to continually review the letters of the alphabet! Have your child retell the story. Re-enact a story together. Ask lots of open-ended questions throughout the story. This helps to instill familiarity with the written word and develop a love of reading. So have fun with your child.
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Kindergarten - 6th Grade

List of 7 items.

  • Entering Kindergarten

    Things to Remember Before the Start of School

    • Kindergarten students are required to wear uniforms. Please note, school logo shirts are encouraged, but not required, with the exception of one red shirt with the logo for special dress days. No logos other than the school’s are allowed.
    • Kindergarten students will need an Art smock (large t-shirt works best) – labeled with your child’s name written with a permanent marker in large print on the back of the shirt.
    • All school supplies are covered through your supply fee, with the exception of a lunchbox and a backpack.
    • We also ask that each kindergartner bring a towel to use for a daily rest time as well as a reusable water bottle to use each day. Please label everything with your child’s name.
    Here is a list of some of kindergarten’s favorite authors. We recommend any of the books by these authors.

    Felicia Bond
    Jan Brett
    Marc Brown
    Eric Carle
    Mem Fox
    Gail Gibbons
    Kevin Henkes
    Pat Hutchins
    Steven Kellogg
    Leo Lionni
    Arnold Lobel
    Robert McCloskey
    James Marshall
    Robert Munsch
    Laura Numeroff
    Marcus Pfister
    Cynthia Rylant
    David Shannon
    William Stieg
    Dr. Seuss
    Mark Teague
    Judith Voirst
    Mo Willems

    Some suggested reading strategies:

    Reading together is an excellent way to help your child grow as a reader. Don’t forget to re-read old favorites. If your child has memorized the text, be sure that he or she points to the words while reading. This is a great way to boost confidence and increase excitement.
     
    • When reading a familiar book, read one sentence and ask your child to complete the next.
    • When reading a rhyming book, read up to the second rhyming word and encourage your child to fill in the rhyming word. How many more rhyming words can your child think of?
    • Ask your child to look at the pictures, or take a “picture walk”, before you read. This is a great way for your child to obtain information about what may be happening in the story.
    • Ask your child questions while reading to strengthen comprehension: What do you think will happen next? What is the name of the dog in the story (who, what, when, where)?
    • How many words on the page can your child identify?
    • Find words on the page that begin with a certain letter to search for and write them down.
    • Choose a word from the story you are reading. Next, write it down and have your child think of some rhyming words to go with that word. How about making a list?
    • Read a story to your child, but let them predict the ending. Then finish the story to see if they were correct.

    Strengthening Fine Motor Skills & Reinforcing Math Skills

    • Collect shells at the beach. Count them and sort them into “families.” Make designs with them or use them to decorate a sandcastle, a picture, a frame, a box, etc.
    • Use a finger or stick to write letters and words in the sand.
    • String beads or pasta. Make an interesting pattern on your necklace or bracelet.
    • Play board games. They are great for counting!
    • Paper clip chains. Encourage your child to make jewelry with paper clips. The colored ones are fun.
    • Play Pickup Sticks. You can buy a commercial set or use 18 drinking straws.
    • Use tweezers for moving small items. Use them to pick up cotton balls, lima beans, kidney beans, popcorn, etc. Fill a small container with the items. Use a timer to make it exciting.
    • Use screws and nuts/bolts. Have child screw the nut/bolt all the way on the screw using a twisting motion with his/her hand.
    • Make homemade bread. The kneading is great muscle work.
    • Use medicine droppers. Use food coloring to color water in different glasses. Have your child use the dropper to make a design or picture on a paper towel. Start with primary colors and mix to make new colors.
    • Berry Picking. If there is a berry patch nearby, this is a fun activity.
    • Encourage play with Play-Doh, modeling clay, or edible play dough.
     
    Reinforcing Letter Recognition, Language Development and Encouraging Creative Expression

    • Long Distance Correspondence – Draw a picture or write a note for a friend or family member and mail it. If you send a note to your teacher, she’ll probably send a note back to you!
    • Make an Alphabet Book. Have your child write the letter, then on the same or opposite page glue a picture-drawn or cut out that begins with the letter.
    • Letter Hide and Seek: Have your child search around the house for one particular letter in magazines, books, on toy boxes, food labels, etc.
    • Alphabet Block Match: Using alphabet blocks, write out simple 3 letter words for your child to match with blocks.
    • Letter or number Hopscotch: Use chalk to draw a hopscotch game board on sidewalk. Print a different letter or number in each square. Name the letter or number as they hop.
    • Fun with Shaving Cream: Have a shaving cream war! Just kidding!! Spray shaving cream on the table or on a tray and smear it around. Have your child practice writing letters, words, and numbers in the shaving cream.
    • Finger Paint Soap: Use in the tub to write different numbers and letters.
    • Rhyming Words: See how many rhyming words you and your child can come up with. This is a great car activity. Go back and forth saying words that rhyme.
    • Cut out pictures in magazines and catalogues. Make a collage or design. Use the pictures to help create a story.
    • Encourage your child to be an author and/or illustrator of her own book. Staple some pages together and have her draw pictures of what happened in the beginning, a few for the middle and then a picture of what happened at the end. Then she can retell her story to a special audience. If she’d like to have words in her book, have her dictate to you and you can write a sentence or two on each page. Be sure to have your illustrator design a special cover.
    • Read a book to your child and then act out the story together. Your child will love watching you be silly and dramatic!!
    • Make up a play with your children. Perform for grandparents or friends.
    • Just reading together is such an important activity. Have a special time at least once a day when your child has someone read to him/her. Have your child tell you about the story when you are finished. Have him make up a different ending or continue the story.
    • Always have lots of Art Supplies on hand – pencils, crayons, markers, scissors, glue sticks, stencils, hole punchers, stamp sets, envelopes, dot-to-dot pages, coloring books, and construction paper, etc. Encourage your child to be creative. You’ll be amazed at what he/she can create!
     
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  • Entering First Grade

    LANGUAGE ARTS:
    • Read aloud or have someone read to you for 20 minutes daily
    • Rising 1st grade students must keep a book log of books read to them during the summer. The goal is 25 books. (A printable log is available under the Printables section.)
    • Challenge yourself to read books in 100 places!

    MATH:
    • Practice all number facts 0-10
    • Practice counting by twos, fives, and tens
    • Practice the nicknames for all double digit numbers
    • Example: Formal name: 45- Forty Five   Nickname: 45 - Four Ten-five
    A Sample of Rising 1st Grade Expectations:
    • Recognize the features of a sentence (Capital letter at the beginning and punctuation at the end)
    • Recognize and rhyme words that have similar endings (For example: -am, ham, Sam, Pam, -at, cat, bat, sat)
    • Learn to read regularly spelled one-syllable words (cvc words: cat, pot, dim)
    • Know all of the consonant sounds
    • Identify and write all lower and uppercase letters
    • Read sight words from kindergarten (pre-primer and primer)
    • Tell a story with a beginning, middle, and end
    • Count to 100
    • Count 2’s, 5’s, and 10’s
    • Add and subtract within 20
    Read More
  • Entering Second Grade

    Rising 2nd Grade Reading Requirements:
    Keep a Reading Log. (A printable log is available under the Printables section.)
    Challenge yourself to read 50 books during the summer.
    Send us pictures of the places you read at http://smeds2.weebly.com

     
    MATH:
    • Students will use their student login (sent home in May) to assess and track individualized math fact progress at Xtramath
     
    Rising 2nd Grade Expectations:
    • Read a variety of texts including fiction, non-fiction, fables, and poetry.
    • Understand the structure of a story and specifically, beginning, middle, and end
    • Write using proper punctuation and capitalization
    • Write using proper letter formation
    • Understand number bonds
    • Immediate recall ofaddition and subtraction facts to 20
    • Understand tens and ones
     
    Read More
  • Entering Third Grade

    LANGUAGE ARTS
    Rising 3rd Grade Required Reading:

    7 x 9 = Trouble, by Claudia Mills

    Mr. Conklin’s Reading Challenge page requirement: 1,700 pages
    Record summer reading on the Summer Reading Book Log. Entering third graders who reach 1,700+ page goal will be recognized in the fall.

    MATH:
    • Students will use their student login (sent home in May) to assess and track individualized math fact progress at Xtramath
     A sample of rising 3rd grade expectations:
    • Talk about and answer questions about a text using specific examples from the text
    • Understand and retell the most important details of a text.
    • Use the text and context to determine the meaning of words.
    • Immediate recall of Addition and Subtraction Facts to 20 and Multiplication Facts: 2’s, 3’s, 4’s, 5’s, 10’s
    • Add single- and multi-digit numbers with renaming (regrouping)
    Read More
  • Entering Fourth Grade

    Rising 4th Grade Required Reading:
     
    The Gollywhopper Games, by Jody Feldman
    Students will complete comprehension packet for The Gollywhopper Games.
    Students will keep a book log and read a minimum of 1,000 pages.
    (Comprehension packet and book log available to download and print under the Printables section.)

    Mr. Conklin’s Reading Challenge page requirement:  2,500 pages
     
    Rising 4th Grade Required Math:
     
    Students will use their student login (sent home in May) to assess and track individualized math fact progress at Xtramath
     
    Sample rising 4th grade expectations:
    • Make connections between people, events, or important ideas in a text
    • Read grade-level texts with accurate comprehension, pacing, and expression
    • Know how to read and prepare for a class discussion
    • Addition and Subtraction Facts to 20, Multiplication and Division Facts to 10
    • Explain thinking and solutions to math equations and word problems both verbally and through writing
    Read More
  • Entering Fifth Grade

    LANGUAGE ARTS:

    Pick ONE of the following:
      • The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane by Kate DiCamillo
      • Bud, Not Buddy, by Christopher Paul Curtis
    Be prepared to:
      • Identify the following story elements: Main character(s), character traits, main events (beginning, middle, end of story), setting, problem, solution
      • Complete a book project during the first week of school
    Mr. Conklin’s Reading Challenge page requirement: 2500 pages recorded on the Reading Log (available under printables)
     
    MATH: 
    • Students will use their student login (sent home in May) to assess and track individualized math fact progress at Xtramath 
    A sample of rising 5th grade expectations:
    • Write a paragraph with an introductory topic sentence, at least three supporting details, and a closing sentence
    • Understand cause-and-effect relationships
    • Read and be prepared for a class discussion on a given topic
    • Manage a schedule and deadlines for assignments
    • Addition and Subtraction Facts to 20
    • Multiplication and Division Facts to 12
    • Add, Subtract, Multiply and Divide whole numbers
    Read More
  • Entering Sixth Grade

    LANGUAGE ARTS:

    90 Miles to Havana by Enrique-Galbis 

    Be prepared to complete a book project during the first week of school

    Mr. Conklin’s Reading Challenge page requirement: 2500 pages recorded on the book log (available under printables)


    SOCIAL STUDIES
     
    Boy of the Painted Cave, by Justin Denzel (available for check out)
    • Be prepared to take an online quiz on this book during the first week of school.
    • Write a one page, typed summary of the book (12 point, Arial font, double spaced). In your summary describe the setting, the major characters, the conflict, and resolution of the novel. Make a connection between your life and the feelings or experiences of Tao. (Due 8/20).
    Watch Genevieve von Petzinger’s Ted Talk: Why are these 32 symbols found in ancient caves all over Europe?

     
    MATH:

    Students will use their student login (sent home in May) to assess and track individualized math fact progress at Xtramath

    A sample of rising 6th grade expectations:
    • Problem solve 
    • Read complex text fluently with good comprehension
    • Use strategies to clarify when a text is not understood
    • Identify conflict, climax, and resolution in a story
    • Write an organized paragraph
    • Use problem solving strategies to solve real-world math problems
    • Add, subtract, multiply and divide fractions and decimals
    • Find the area of two-dimensional shapes
    • Multiplication and Division Facts to 24 
    • Have a sense of variable and equations
    • Understand data analysis
    Read More

Summer Reading Challenge

We are challenging our students to be Super Summer Readers! Students entering third through sixth grade are challenged to reach and surpass the following goals. Please bring your completed Summer Reading Log on the first day of school.

Third Grade: 1,700 Pages
Fourth, Fifth & Sixth Grade: 2,500 Pages

Printables

Faculty Recommended Summer Reading